In Response to 3 Common Myths of Gentrification

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Professor Sutton provides some strong arguments to combat gentrification within the cities through;

  • Policies that implement rent control
  • Restricting predatory investment schemes
  • Speculatory investment funds

All of these are very possible, however, cities are viewed as corporations, meaning that there main interest is to make money. This is one of the main reasons why you don’t see that much pushback from new developments and the gentrification of certain neighbourhoods. There needs to be a progressive government in place to create these progressive policies. If not, gentrification will likely continue. We also need to look into community land trusts and new development that support rent-geared-to-income housing. These actors won’t stop gentrification, but will reduce the impact it has on a community.

I would argue with Professor Sutton that revitalization and re-development of communities are also forms of gentrification. We spoke about terminology and the importance of it in my environmental design course last term and we grouped terms like renewal, revitalization, and re-development under gentrification. There’s the example of Little Havana in Miami, where the community began a revitalization project that lead to the gentrification of the community. If you have the chance, I would recommend reading Back to Little Havana by Feldman and Jovilet.

Gentrification has impacted the working class and those with low incomes, but in the US it is slightly different since these low-income communities are for the  most part comprised of blacks. There are some scholars in the US that believe gentrification is a form of colonialism. I’ll discuss the topic of colonialism and gentrification in a later post. Lastly, the spotlight has been on gentrification in the media for the past few years. However, gentrification is not a new phenomena, it has been ongoing for the past 50+ years affecting communities across the globe.

You can read the original article on gentrification here: 3 Common Myths of Gentrification.

Politics Uncategorized Urban

Reduce Private Transportation and Invest in Public Transit

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A recent article published by Scientific America discovered that if cities where to invest towards public transportation and other alternatives it could greatly reduce the amount of carbon emissions produced by urban passenger transport. In Toronto an estimated 2,838,506  tonnes of Green House Gases (GHG) are produced by passenger vehicles. The article goes in depth and analyses both the investment and savings this will create towards cities. More importantly, the article examines the massive growth of cities and the car is linked to inequality.

I highly recommend you read the article to learn more information on urban sustainability.

Read More: Cars will cook the plant absent shift to public transportation 

Photo by: Stefan Georgi

 

 

Uncategorized