I would like to share with you all a great article that interviews Mike Ford. Ford is an architect and discusses the relationship between hip-hop and urban planning.He mentions that hip-hop came to be through structural racism, poor urban planning, and architect. Near the end of his interview, he emphasizes the importance of representation in urban planning and architecture, not only as professionals. But as community leaders, authors and researchers. Ford recognize that:

As long as people from the outside are telling the story, that narrative will continue. We need to continue to get people of color involved in architecture, as urban planners, as professors, as authors. It’s important for minorities to enter architecture because, throughout the United States, our communities have been designed, uprooted, and pretty much destroyed by architects and urban planners who do not look like us and unfortunately have little to desire to communicate with us during the planning of those events.

So what can happen if we get more minorities involved in architecture and architecture fields such as urban planning? You’re gonna have people at the table who are sensitive to the fabrics of [their] communities and understand what it means to not uproot them. Having a voice at that table to be an advocate for those underrepresented communities is essential. Architecture can destroy and inhibit people from becoming their best, but it also has the power to uplift and empower them. If we’re going to achieve the latter, it’s got to be a collaborative effort.

This excerpt resonated with me, both scholarly articles and testimonials from community members are pointing towards advocacy  and equity planning for communities for a number of reasons. One of them being, people of colour involved in architecture and planning can better represent the community and understand the needs of community members.

There are a number of hip-hop songs that discuss everyday life and poor planning, artist like Public Enemy, Snoop Dogg, NWA, A Trible Called Quest, Kendrick Lamar and Grandmaster Flash all come to mind. Here’s Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five rapping about the conditions in New York in the early 1980s:

There are a number of hip-hop songs that discuss everyday life and poor planning, artists like Public Enemy, Snoop Dogg, NWA, A Trible Called Quest, Kendrick Lamar and Grandmaster Flash all come to mind. Here’s Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five rapping about the conditions in New York in the early 1980s:


How Bad Urban Planning Led to The Birth of a Billion-Dollar Genre

Hip-Hop Architecture

 

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